Lynne

Tips For A Happy Holiday Belly


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IT'S ALMOST THE MOST WONDERFUL (er, unhealthy) time of the year. But honestly, the GOOD NEWS is the effects of holiday indulgences – particularly in regard to weight gain – tend to be quite exaggerated.  

In actuality, a 2016 study published in The New England Journal of Medicine found that the average American gains 1.3 pounds in the 10 days following Christmas. Even more so, a previous study found that the average person only gains 0.8 pounds between mid-November to mid-January. Thank goodness it is considerably less than the 5 pounds we hear about.

But keep in mind, very soon there will be all these delicious treats everywhere we turn and in spite of our best efforts to keep food indulgences to a minimum, there are times when we find it's nearly impossible to resist.

AND YOU KNOW WHAT... IT'S OKAY! Just have a plan, since the sort of BAD NEWS is that our temporary lack of constraint... the what feels like the believed 5lb weight gain is actually an upset tummy, bloating, gas, constipation, brain fog, and lethargy. It may be better than weight gain, but still makes for uncomfortableness, added stress, and crankiness. 

But don't despair, remember it will be okay. Here are some natural and inexpensive remedies to keep or jump start your digestive system back into high gear. Just by staying present and turning easily assessable foods into goldmines for the digestive system.

 

First a quick biology lesson.

Our digestive system is an important key to living a long and healthy life. Digestive function is made up of numerous organs working together to break down, absorb, & process nutrients in the food we eat. Without healthy digestion, the body can become malnourished and toxins may build up, leading to degenerative diseases.

 

Mindful Eating
Before anything else, when walking in a minefield of edibles, pick out what really pleases your taste buds and savor it. This will help with only eating until satisfied and not until unbuttoning your jeans is the only thing on your mind.

When you are picking up that third fruit tartlet, think about why you have to have it. Is it scarcity thinking? This will not be here next month. Is it stress? If I have to replace one more bulb in this string of lights, I'll scream. Is it loneliness? Holidays just aren't the same without a past loved one. 

 

Herbal Elixir

Warm and soothing caffeine-free herbal teas can reduce an uncomfortable, bloated system. These medicinal leaves become digestive support upon contact.

Peppermint - Used for centuries to ease dissipation of gas and indigestion.

Chamomile - With anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic properties, the calming effects of this tea also help relieve stress, which is often linked to digestive problems.

Lemongrass - Soothes the digestive system and calms the nerves.

 

Go Green

Green juices are packed with nutrition and enables the release of stored toxins throughout the system. Green juices can cleanse your digestive system, helping to move things along while providing an extra dose of readily available nutrients. Energizing for the body and brain. 

Start with vegetables that are gentle on your system like celery and cucumbers, adding a little apple to sweeten things up.

Warning, be careful not to overload a healthy green juice with too many sugary fruits/ingredients. Stay on the low glycemic scale. 

 

Natural Enzymes

Pineapples contain the digestive enzyme bromelain, and papayas contain papain.

These natural enzymes support the digestive system in breaking down and absorbing nutrients from the foods we eat. 

Consuming the fresh juice from these fruits can help relieve gas, upset stomach and occasional constipation and diarrhea.


Pucker Up
Lemon activates the liver to release toxins and helps to cleanse and move any roughage that stays behind in the intestines.

Mix half of a juiced lemon with eight ounces of warm water. Drink upon waking on an empty stomach.


Spice It Up
Ginger stimulates digestion by speeding up the movement of food from the stomach into the small intestine. 

Widely used all over the world for many digestive disturbances, ginger has been found to soothe the digestive lining and balance gastric juices, making it a great remedy for overeating.

Peel and slice a two-inch piece of fresh ginger. Add to three cups of boiling water. Brew for five minutes, strain and sip the tea slowly. You may add some natural sweetener to taste.


Naturally Fermented
Naturally high in probiotics, foods such as raw sauerkraut provide beneficial enzymes that increase the digestibility of any food. This enhances lactic acid which in turn promotes the growth of healthy flora throughout the intestines as well as preventing the growth of harmful bacteria and increasing nutrient absorption.

 

If we start now, with practicing mindfulness and using herbs & whole foods to support the natural detoxification organs of our body we will feel like an angel gracefully floating through the holiday season and be comfortable in our skin and cute festive clothes.

Even though the temptation to indulge may be more likely to occur during the holidays, these simple, natural remedies can promote healthy digestion any time of the year.



 

Do you have any of your own natural remedies or tips for managing seasonal overindulgences? I'd love to hear from you! Please click here to leave a comment. Be sure to share with your friends. 

 



 

How would you like to feel be in control during this holiday season? Let’s talk! Schedule an initial complimentary consultation with me today by emailing me at lynne@lynnecampanaro.com or click below to learn more about my unique approach to Living Truly Healthy, Fit & Happy.

 



 

 


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Lynne

THE SERVING SIZE SECRET

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Hello Friends,

 
Quick Quiz: How many portions are in a

bag of snack-size whole grain crackers? Or a

small bottle of locally- pressed juice? Or a

lunchbox pack of granola bars?

 

Hint: it’s not “one.” Often, the above

products contain two or two-and-a-half

servings per package.

 

Can YOU Eat Just One?

Sure, you could go ahead and enjoy just half the bag, but are you really going to do

that? Don’t beat yourself up if the answer is no: If you place food in front of most

people, they tend to eat it all. It’s just the way we’re wired.

 

The Perils of Supersizing

Eating too much food in one sitting is hard on your body. Here’s why:

  • Food is intended to be spread throughout the day. Overdosing on too much food at one time causes pain, upset, and sluggish digestion. A surge of glucose is released into your blood. Your pancreas has to work overtime, pumping insulin through the body to absorb all that extra glucose. This can make you feel spacey, weak, irritable, or headachy.
  • Thinking there is some type of emergency, your adrenal glands go into “fight or flight” mode and release adrenaline and cortisol, which is the body’s natural response to stress.
  • When your blood sugar levels finally plummet, you experience wicked cravings for more food—specifically simple carbs or sweets.
  • Research has found that immune system function is affected for at least five hours after consuming large amounts of simple carbohydrates.

 

5 Tips to Kick Portion Distortion:

  • Don’t over order – go for salads, soups, and appetizers, which are typically more reasonably sized than entrees.
  • Choose high-fiber foods like vegetables, fruits, beans, and whole grains to keep you feeling full and energized.
  • Chew well to aid digestion and give your brain time to register you’re full before you overeat.
  • Get enough water. Often we mistake thirst for hunger.
  • Carry your own snacks. Stock up on snack-sized containers and fill them with baby carrots, air-popped, popcorn, salmon jerky, or nuts.

Let me know what snacks you will start making handy in the comments

 

xoxo, Lynne

  

GET EVEN HEALTHIER!
Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes (such as chewing your food more

thoroughly) can make a big difference in your health? Would you like help in making

healthier food choices? Let’s talk! Schedule a complimentary health coaching

consultation with me today!

 

Get ready to be fit and take back your power from the damaging diet industry! 

Click here for a free copy of 14 Loving Ways To Nourish Your Soul and learn more

about my unique approach to health coaching at lynnecampanaro.com.

 

Are you interested in becoming an Integrative Nutrition Health Coach and starting a

career you’ve always dreamed of? Click here to learn more!

 



 


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Lynne

Be Intentional! Let's make it happen!

 

Hello Beautiful Friend,

Two friends are chatting about their diets. The first one says, “I want to be healthy and feel great.” The second one says, “I intend to be healthy and feel great.”

Which one do you think is going to get healthy and feel great? Yep—the one who intends it.

Wanting is simply wishing you can have or do a particular thing. Intending means you’re committed to achieving something by making a plan for success—and sticking to it!

 

The Fuel for Desired Results


The key to intention is action – try this to build your intention muscle:

Get clear on what you want. Create a vision board by gathering images and words that pertain to your goal, and gluing them onto a large piece of construction paper. Hang the collage in a spot where you will see it often. Another option for the tech-y is to use an online broad like Pinterest or Trello to create a digital vision board. Or a note taking app like Keeper or Evernote. Then set a reminder to check it out each day.


Do something to make your desire happen. Let’s say you want to eat four servings of vegetables a day. Your first action may be to go to a farmers’ market and purchase a few veggies for the week you can cook for dinner.


Celebrate your achievement! Don’t forget to congratulate yourself for meeting your goal.


How to Have a Great Day… Every Day!


Did you know that you can even set an intention to have a great day?

Rather than diving into your morning and hoping you’ll achieve your day’s big goal, why not take a moment and set yourself up for success?

Try this “Setting An Intention to Succeed” exercise used by professional athletes, speakers, politicians, and performers:

Upon waking, lie in bed and think about what you have planned for your day (or, find a quiet spot to sit and contemplate). Think about your desired outcome. Take a deep breath and visualize yourself succeeding. Replay your success several times in your mind. Next, add other senses, including sounds, smells, and touch. For instance, as you replay your success, you now also hear the director offering you the gig, or you feel the physical sensation of your finger hitting the “send” button on your latest assignment. Lastly, replay the scene again, adding emotions. Feel your elation at getting the part, or your pride at finally finishing your work.


You can perform An Intention to Succeed, throughout the day as desired.

 

xo,

Lynne


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Lynne


 
Blueberries

The first step to reaching our ideal weight is to find out WHY we eat when we're not hungry. Being MINDFUL will do this. I know this is going to sound weird, but besides shedding pounds, we will learn so much about what is going on inside our heads and hearts. Next time you are headed to the refrigerator and realize that you are not hungry but really, really want to gorge on those last six brownies topped with dark chocolate chips (my fav), HALT and ask yourself, what is going on with me? Why do I want to eat?

Much of the time what leads to overeating is not dealing with what bothers us. It could be stress at work or the cute guy from the coffee shop who didn't call or perhaps your child's rebellious behavior. Maybe the reason for eating is as simple as boredom, and reaching for tasty treats offers an exciting solution (at least for our taste buds).

However, at best it is a temporary high to fill a void. Shortly after, the same feelings pop up, with the addition of a  bloated pang of guilt. If you are hungry, eat, but make it special. Put it on a pretty dish, then really pay attention to what you are putting into your mouth. Eat without distractions around you -- no cell phone, no TV, no computer, no books, no newspaper. MINDFUL eating is learning to use all your senses to get the most out food. Smell the food. Look at the colors of food. Think of where it came from. Think about how it feels on your lips and in your mouth. Savor the food's taste, and chew deliberately.

Our lives are all super busy, but how about starting to PRACTICE mindful eating a little each day? Starting today, let's listen to our bodies' wisdom, instead of ignoring what we really need and stuffing our not-so-good feelings far back in the closet. Sometimes, things may get blown out of proportion, but being in tune with our eating habits and what is going on with our hearts helps both our well-being and our waistline. Instead, Journal it out, give yourself a manicure, ring an old friend, go for a walk, work on that neglected project, pray, etc. Simply say: I am not going to let this baloney bother me! Most of all do not stuff it. When we face our troubling situations, we become stronger and satisfied.

Comments? thoughts?

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Lynne

Sweet Kabocha Squash Soup

 



Prep Time
About a 1/2 hour to 40 minutes

Notes
 
With the fall weather here, I have been playing with hearty squash and gourds. It is such a fabulous healthy comfort food. I found this recipe in The Kind Diet by Alicia Silverstone. I had to share it because it is so simple, delicious, and good for you. Alicia says, it soothes the digestion process. 

If you prefer, you can easily use butternut squash. Sometimes it is easier to find butternut squash and if you want to make prep time even shorter, most grocery stores have butternut squash already cubed. Also, if you would like, use an herb beside parsley. Like cilantro, basil, chives, or thyme. I have sprinkled basil on for an added pop of unique flavor. 

 
Cooking Time
1/2 hour

Yields
3 to 4 servings


Ingredients
 

4 cups of kabocha squash, peeled and cut into 2" cubes

3 1/2 cups of water

2 pinches of fine sea salt

Minced fresh parsley

 
Directions
 

Place the squash in a saucepan with 3 1/2 cups of water. Bring to boil, and add a pinch of salt. Cover, lower the heat and simmer for 15 minutes until the squash is soft. Mash the squash with a potato masher, or blend with a handheld blender, right in the pot. Add another pinch of salt, and simmer for 7 to 10 minutes longer. Serve the soup hot with a sprinkle of parsley on top.

 



 


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